Phone: (610) 286-0018    Fax: (610) 286-0021

What Happens During An Evaluation Appointment At My Pet’s Brace?

By: Terry Lackmeyer, My Pet’s Brace Customer Service Representative

Frequently, owners express concern about the evaluation appointment for their dog’s leg brace. Many fear that we aLeg Casting During Evaluation Appointmentre going to manipulate the dog’s leg and cause pain, or that they will not be able to remain with their pet. Neither of those thoughts are true. So, let me explain what happens during the evaluation appointment.

The first thing needed for the appointment is a written diagnosis from your vet or rehab professional telling us about your dog’s injury. Since we are not veterinarians, we need to know the exact diagnosis so that we can be sure we are making the correct leg brace for your dog’s injury.

Next, you and your dog will be taken into an exam room where you will meet with the clinician. After taking time to review the information from your vet and meeting you and your dog, the clinician will ask several questions regarding your dog’s living arrangements, time spent inside vs outside, activity level, and any other pets in the household. The clinician will discuss your dog’s injury and observe your dog walking up and down the hallway several times. The clinician may feel your dog’s leg to check for any swelling or discomfort. We may bend your dog’s leg, in a normal flexing motion, to listen for any type of clicking or popping sounds. This will not hurt the dog. If the dog shows any type of discomfort with this flexion, the clinician will stop.

Once the clinician has gathered all the information, we will explain what is going on in your dog’s leg and how and why the brace will help. You will have ample opportunity to ask any questions you may have. Sometimes, the clinician has the unfortunate task of telling the client that the brace is not the correct solution for the dog’s injury. Rest assured that if we do not feel a brace is appropriate for your pet, we will be honest and let you know that. If that occurs, there is no charge for the evaluation appointment.

After explaining your dog’s injury and how and why the brace will help and making sure you want to move forward with the brace, the clinician will make a cast of your dog’s leg. You will be with your dog the entire time, helping to keep them calm. Someone will support your dog under their belly, so they are comfortable while the clinician does the casting. The casting process takes less than 5 minutes and is completely painless and non-invasive for the dog. The toughest thing your dog will need to do is stand there, with support of course. After casting, the clinician will take measurements of your dog’s leg. If your dog is getting a hock or carpal brace, the clinician will make a tracing of your dog’s paw.

Once the cast is complete and the owner has no further questions, payment will be handled at the front desk. All braces must be paid in full before the brace goes into production.  We accept all credit cards, cash, check and Care Credit.

Our goal during the evaluation, or any of our appointments, is to provide a warm, friendly atmosphere for both the dog and owner. We want to answer all your questions and alleviate any concerns you may have regarding the brace and your dog.

Roses are Red, Violets are Blue, What Color Brace Shall I Do?

By: Terry Lackmeyer, My Pet’s Brace Customer Service Representative

While getting a leg brace for your dog is very serious, believe it or not, it does have a lighter side – choosing a brace color. For some people it is very easy, for others it requires much thought and sometimes, a family pow-pow. The good part is, we have 35 different colors and patterns from which to choose.

Some people prefer that no one notices the brace and want it to blend as nearly as possible with the dog’s coat. For those people, a solid color closely matching the dog’s coat color works well. You even can take it a step further and choose one of our patterns that looks like dog hair (but without the shedding).

Other folks feel that since the dog must wear a brace, making it fun is the way to go. For those people we have every solid color to fit the ROY G BIV mnemonic code plus white, black, brown, silver and tan.  Our most popular brace color is hot pink.

For those adventurous folks, we have various patterns that can be fused to the brace to really spice up the appearance. The hunter in the family may want the camouflage pattern; the kids, the shark or graffiti design. The star gazer may look to the cosmos or starry nights pattern; the sophisticate may lean toward the carbon fiber design; while the fashion conscience may opt for the cheetah or zebra print. Finally, for those that like abstracts the yellow/orange or blue swirl may be the way to go.

Regardless of the color or pattern chosen, rest assured that the brace will be durable and easy to maintain. Water will never harm the color or patterns and all braces are completely waterproof and easy to clean with anti-bacterial soap and water. Dog braces can even be worn in the pool or during hydrotherapy with no ill effects.

As we like to remind owners, braces work the same no matter what color or pattern is chosen. The important point is that while we enjoy providing fun color choices, our first and foremost goal is to make the most comfortable, effective, and functional brace to help your dog with their orthopedic condition and to help them to live happier lives.

When Are X-Rays Needed To Make A Dog Brace?

By: Terry Lackmeyer, My Pet’s Brace Customer Service Representative

When a dog incurs an injury, sometimes x-rays are taken to get the “inside” scoop on exactly what’s going on with that injury.  Does that mean that we need to see x-rays to make a leg brace for your dog? Well, it depends on the injury.

If your dog has a Cranial Cruciate Ligament (CCL/ACL) injury, the injured ligament will not show up on x-rays. However, your vet may take X-rays of the knee because they want to rule out other possibilities. They may be looking to see if your dog has arthritis, a tumor or cancer. Once they see that there is nothing else lurking in your dog’s knee and they have gotten a positive result on what is called a “drawer test” on your dog’s leg, they can feel comfortable diagnosing your dog with a CCL injury.

Braces can often be used to help dogs that suffer from arthritis. These can be stifle, carpal, hock, or elbow braces since arthritis can occur in any joint. In that case, we would want to see X-rays to determine the location of the arthritis and if a brace would be an appropriate solution.

Carpal, hock, and elbow braces for dogs can be used for a variety of issues – everything from hyperextension to elbow dysplasia and many conditions in between. If we feel X-rays are needed, we will request that x-rays be provided to us before or at the time of the initial consultation.

Many times, owners contact us because their dog has been diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a type of bone cancer than often leads to spontaneous fractures. Then x-rays are very important to determine the exact location and involvement of the cancer. Frequently, we can provide a brace which is created with a front and back piece so the brace acts like a splint to help prevent or prolong the possibility of a fracture yet can be easily removed to care for the leg.

Rest assured, if we feel x-rays are required, we will request that they be provided so that we can be sure to make the best and most appropriate brace for your dog’s injury.

 

To Shave Or Not To Shave (The Dog’s Leg)

By: Terry Lackmeyer, My Pet’s Brace Customer Service Representative

Owners frequently ask us if their dog’s leg needs to be shaved for the casting process or to wear a brace/prosthesis. The good news is that no, you do not, and there are several good reasons for that.

The first reason is that we are in favor of anything that reduces stress for the dog. For many dogs, shaving the leg is stressful and upsetting and if there is any way we can avoid stressing our patients, we will. The skin on the leg can also get irritated from shaving and we don’t want to do anything that causes more irritation to an already injured leg.

The second reason is that we have learned how to work with hairy dogs, and the hair does not get in the way. When casting a dog’s leg, the leg is first covered with a stockinette (a thin sock-like material). This compresses the hair on the leg. For those hairier dogs, such as Golden Retrievers or Newfoundlands, as much of the hair as possible is gathered inside the stockinette. This helps the casting process by keeping most of the excess hair out of the way as the cast is taken. The fiberglass tape is wrapped snuggly around the leg, thereby compressing the hair even more, helping to ensure a good cast is taken and, subsequently, a well-fitting brace is made.

Finally, when the dog is wearing the brace that extra hair under the brace acts as a nice protective cover. This helps to reduce possible irritation as the hair provides additional cushioning.

Sometimes owners will comment that all that extra hair gets caught in the Velcro straps and makes putting the brace on more difficult. In that case, owners may choose to use scissors to trim away some of the excess hair. That’s perfectly fine and will not affect the fit of the brace.

Our ultimate goal is to make the casting and bracing process as pleasant and stress free as possible for not only the patient, but also the owner. If an owner wishes to trim excess hair to make putting the brace on easier, that’s fine, but from our point-of-view the dog’s hair is a benefit and shaving the leg is not needed.

Case Study: Grady – a Labrador Retriever with an Elbow Brace for Arthritis

By: Amy Rosenthal, My Pet’s Brace Practitioner

The Patient: Grady, an 11 year-old, 74-pound, Labrador Retriever with severe arthritis of the right elbow.

Case of Interest: Over 80% of our business is providing stifle braces for Cranial Cruciate Ligament injuries. However, we also fabricate carpal, hock and elbow braces for multiple etiologies.

Grady was diagnosed with severe arthritis in his right elbow. His owners were medically managing his condition for approximately 5 years when they decided to pursue an elbow brace for additional stabilization.

Diagnostic History: In October 2017 Grady presented to our clinic for a brace for his right elbow for severe arthritis. The brace aids in protecting the joint as well as giving the elbow stability and support. An evaluation of his condition and lifestyle were evaluated and it was determined that he would benefit from an elbow brace.

A cast was made of Grady’s elbow from the styloids of the radius and ulna to as high into the axilla as possible. This cast was then used to create a custom-made brace for Grady. This brace was made with a closed-cell foam interior, a hard-medical grade plastic exterior and specialized veterinary urethane joints at the elbow.  Range of motion straps allowed 10-15° of motion at the joint. The brace was fit and adjustments were made as necessary.

Grady was given a restricted exercise regiment, which included eliminating running and ball/dog playing.  Stairs were limited to 1 to 4 steps and if more than 4 steps were required, then some help would be needed. Leashed walks were encouraged, starting with 3 times a day for around 5 to 10 minutes each.  As he became accustomed to the brace, his walks increased and he was given more freedom.

Follow-Ups: Grady was seen approximately 1 month, 3 ½ months, and 6 ½ months after delivery. At each of the follow-up appointments his condition was evaluated and straps were replaced as necessary. He was able to go out for walks and was off most of his pain meds. Unfortunately, he had a recurrence of soft tissue sarcoma in his good elbow in August 2018 which is being managed.  With the help of the brace, Grady is getting along well and he enjoyed playing in the snow this winter.